TEIOTIOHKWEHAHTON

15 Aug TEIOTIOHKWEHAHTON

TEIOTIOHKWEHAHTON – BEADWORK: Visions of Peace

“Among the Peoples of the Northeast Woodlands of North America, purple and white, quahog shell, Wampum Beads were strung together for a variety of diplomatic, historical, and ceremonial purposes. For examples, Wampum Beads were used for formal Invitations, recording treaty events, and delivering condolences. Native Immigrant has identified Teiotiohkwenhahton, the Iroquois Circle Wampum as a symbol of its Beadwork, Visions of Peace project.

“The fifty strings of quahog beads inside the Circle Wampum represent the fifty founding families of the Iroquois Confederacy. They are bound together by two intertwining sets of quahog beads. Their equal length represents Sha’tetionkwatte’, the philosophical basis of the Six Nation Iroquois vision of world peace: We Are All the Same Height.

“The Tree of Great Peace grows metaphorically at the heart of the Iroquois Confederacy. Its Four Bright Roots spread out in four directions to all corners of the world. All who embrace the philosophy of Shat’tetionkwatte’ are welcomed to follow the roots, to take shelter beneath the Tree of Peace. The Eagle at the top of the tree sees afar, protects the children, and guards against approaching dangers.

Iroquois thought recognizes that all peoples were once natural world peoples with powerful minds. Healthy minds naturally desire peace. Peace can be defined as the absence of injustice. People carry memories of former times. How can visions of peace be remembered?

Native Immigrant wishes to facilitate the sharing of the world’s visions of peace. How have they been recorded and remembered? Was it with beads or with some other art form? How can we jog each others memories about the structure of peace.

Philip Deering – Native Immigrant Cultural Interpreter